• No Products in the Cart

The Inside Scoop on Visiting Stonehenge (For Free) + MAP!

stonehenge for free, how to see stonehenge for free, the best way to see stonehenge, is stonehenge worth itAfter touring in our Quirky Camper, Hector, for over 2 weeks now we have visited and lived in a number of incredible little spots! Including one of the wonders of the world, aka. the best-known prehistoric monument in Europe, aka. STONEHENGE.

We were told that it was best to purchase tickets online beforehand (as you save about $5 per ticket), but we had also read that it was a waste because you are roped off from being able to get up close and personal to those stone giants, which is why many preferred Avebury. We were hesitant to purchase, since they’re about $30 a pop, and so decided to wing it and see what we thought for ourselves.stonehenge england, giant stones, famous stone circle, giant rocks, honeymoon in london, romantic england, mr and mrs adventureLet us say a bit before we continue: We have gladly paid entry to numerous historical sites – The Roman Baths, Salisbury Cathedral, Corfe Castle, Westminster Abbey, the list goes on – posts coming soon 🙂 The difference is that we feel the entry to the stones was a bit steep and being that there is alternative option for experiencing such an incredible world wonder, why not walk a few extra steps and save a few extra dollars to put towards experiencing another site, ultimately allowing you to make even more beautiful memories! On with the post. We were welcomed by a beautiful visitor’s center and a hefty line up of tour buses. After approaching the ticketing booth we realized that many people were just walking the road/trail to the stones… for free?… We didn’t know how far this would take us but we decided to give it a whirl.

stonehenge england, giant stones, famous stone circle, giant rocks, honeymoon in london, romantic england, mr and mrs adventure, walking to stonehengeWe arrived early that morning (around 10am) and the trail was still covered in frost!:

stonehenge england, giant stones, famous stone circle, giant rocks, honeymoon in london, romantic england, mr and mrs adventure, frosted grass, morning frostIt was about a 2.5-mile walk from the visitor’s center, but being that it was such a beautiful day, it was quite enjoyable. When we finally approached the final hill that would reveal the famous stone giants, we noticed there was someone checking tickets and just when we thought it was the end of the road for us, we noticed a biker going up a side road, along with a few other cars that had parked where he was going. Naturally, we decided to check it out, and this is what we discovered:

stonehenge for free, how to see stonehenge for free, the best way to see stonehenge, stonehenge sheep, sheep in englandstonehenge for free, how to see stonehenge for free, the best way to see stonehenge, stonehenge sheep, sheep in englandstonehenge for free, how to see stonehenge for free, the best way to see stonehenge, is stonehenge worth itIt was absolutely gorgeous, stunning, awe-inspiring. On top of having a clear-shot of the stones, we had the added bonus of getting to watch all the sheep (see “Pano View” in the map below)! Though they weren’t as friendly as the sheep in Iceland, or as round as the sheep in Maine, they had their own unique personality and look to them. Just look at those fuzzy little faces!:

stonehenge for free, how to see stonehenge for free, the best way to see stonehenge, stonehenge sheep, sheep in englandThis one was especially popular with the birds:

stonehenge for free, how to see stonehenge for free, the best way to see stonehenge, stonehenge sheep, sheep in englandstonehenge england, giant stones, famous stone circle, giant rocks, honeymoon in london, romantic england, mr and mrs adventureAs we took our time admiring the view and feeling the power of such a special place, we were approached by a kind, old farmer (he literally came out of nowhere) who told us (and we later noticed him standing by the ticketing counter telling everyone he could) about another (free) trail we could take to get even CLOSER to the stones (see “Close up view” in the map below)!  We couldn’t quite figure out why he was doing this except maybe his family used to own the land the stones are on? With unanswered questions and an adventure to be had, we packed up our gear and onto discover the new trail we went:

stonehenge for free, how to see stonehenge for free, the best way to see stonehenge, free trail stonehenge, best way to see stonehenge, closest to stonehenge trailDirections (see map below for illustration): On the opposite side of road to Stonehenge there is grassy field, beyond the 1st fence there is gate. Go through that gate and walk forward until you see a path that goes to the right. This path takes you face-to-face with the giant Heel Stone!:

stonehenge england, giant stones, famous stone circle, giant rocks, honeymoon in london, romantic england, mr and mrs adventureHere’s a little video clip we took when we arrived to that very spot:

And here’s an awesome time lapse we took of our trek up to that heel stone – you gotta love those sheep!

And here’s our detailed map and guide to help you along your adventure in discovering this epic world wonder for yourself!:

stonehenge free map, stonehenge for free map, how to see stonehenge for free, stonehenge free, wonders of the world stonehenge, romantic stonehenge, honeymoon england, free things to do in englandIn conclusion, if you have a bit more time and are up for an adventure (Tip: wear boots, it’s muddy), there truly is no need to purchase tickets. The biggest benefit of taking the road less traveled is that it felt like we had the entire place to ourselves! We hardly had to deal with any tourists, at all. Though you are not granted access to the Visitor’s Center without a ticket, it really is no bother. You can still download the Stonehenge Guide app on your smart phone and browse the gift shop! That Stonehenge snow globe was reallyyyy tempting 😉

Stonehenge snow globe, Stonehenge souvenir, Stonehenge for free

 

 

 

 

26 Comments

  1. Reply

    Mariah

    September 9, 2018

    We are going in February 2019 will it be too cold for Stonehenge?

    • Reply

      Brittany Rouille

      September 9, 2018

      We were there February 2016 and t was cold but with a down jacket, boots and beanie we did it!

  2. Reply

    Chelsea Albright

    August 15, 2018

    This is great, thank you for the information! My husband and I love exploring off the beaten path when we travel so this sounds right up our alley! Our trip is planned for January 2019 so hopefully this tactic still works!

    • Reply

      Brittany Rouille

      August 20, 2018

      Awesome 🙂 We are happy to help you explore some of our world’s most magical places and still feel like pioneers! Let us know if it still works! I’m almost certain it will. xo

  3. Reply

    Amanda Springall

    April 21, 2018

    Having never been to this wonder of the world and travelling south by 4 and half hours we decided to visit but also felt the fees a bit steep not only that we travel everywhere with our fabulous pooch Ed and this place isn’t dog friendly. So with a little googling for tips. We decided to wing it. We do alot of hiking and prefer to see things from another angle. It’s lovely seeing it from this point of view it’s not being tight rather than feel it’s a more personal approach one to be remember far better than remembering .. some annoying tourist. Couldn’t believe how close we could view them

    • Reply

      Brittany Rouille

      April 22, 2018

      So glad you were able to get up close and personal with out the vibe kill of the shuttle bus and the heard of tourists 😉 Makes the time it takes to write these posts way worth it. xoxo!

  4. Reply

    Jeff

    April 18, 2018

    Sorry some people are leaving negative comments on here. They are perhaps missing the point. I’ve been walking the footpaths and permissive routes to the stones for years and I’m really pleased you found the route and have taken the time to provide some guidance for like minded people. The stones are much more special when approached this way rather than in a shuttle bus with 50 other people. You get to see the tumuli and the cursus and walk where people have walked for at least 5,000 years. Let those who want the OTT visitor centre take the ticketed approach. Hope the govt’s plans to move the road into a huge tunnel won’t disrupt the footpath accesses. Thanks again for putting that map on your blog.

    • Reply

      Brittany Rouille

      April 19, 2018

      You get us 🙂 Thank you for taking the time to share in the sentiment. We had no idea there were plans to create a tunnel… really hoping it doesn’t disturb the footpath as well! It’s so special that we are still able to enjoy/approach those ancient stones on foot as our ancestors once did… hoping it always stays that way. And thank you again for taking the time. xoxo

  5. Reply

    Graham West

    November 23, 2017

    Er if you actually looked into the history of the stones, you’d realise that they did not “survive several thousand years quite happily”. For thousands of years they didn’t have hundreds of visitors turning up every day, and all expecting modern facilities to cater for them. And maybe you just want to conduct a box ticking exercise when you visit these places, but some of us appreciate being able to learn something about the stones, their history, their place in the landscape and other archaeological discoveries, which is what a visitor centre provides.

    • Reply

      Brittany Rouille

      November 26, 2017

      Oh we of course appreciate the learning aspect of the visitor center, we simply felt the barrier to entry could be a bit less steep.

  6. Reply

    Brittany Rouille

    June 12, 2017

    You have to walk, we parked at the visitor center. It’s a nice, enjoyable walk though!

  7. Reply

    Vidya Murugan

    June 12, 2017

    Is it possible to drive to this spot? How close can you drive upto?

  8. Reply

    Matt

    August 9, 2016

    Thanks for the guide and sorry about the negative reaction above. How can you rip anyone off or “insult our culture” by looking at something that is part of the lanscape from public access paths and roads? I just used the track off the 303 where the lower sheep is on the map. Hope you enjoyed your trip, Cheers.

    • Reply

      mrandmrsadventure

      August 10, 2016

      Thank you for the positive feedback, we love how you referenced the lower sheep on our map too ⭐️ The stones should be for everyone to enjoy and respect 🙂 You have a beautiful country, and after traveling across Europe in our GB camper for over 6 months, we feel quite connected to the Brits ❤️

  9. Reply

    Ian

    August 9, 2016

    Thanks. I’ll give it a try today with the kids. And as to anyone claiming £15 or whatever a head goes to the upkeep of the stones, they managed to survive several thousand years quite happily without any entrance fee. I remember almost being arrested with a friend in 1983 by the army when we decided to go and have a look at them just after they put up the razor wire to keep the hippies out.

    I’m sure Stonehenge could easily survive on a couple of quid a head (and free for kids) and skip the gift shop/visitor centre tat. Turning them into Disneyland does no one any favours except whoever is trousering the £15.

    • Reply

      mrandmrsadventure

      August 10, 2016

      Well said! And what a story! We wish we could have seen what the world was like before razor wires, entrance fees and the like… We like to think of ourselves as millennial hippies, trying to keep things wild, free and positive however we can in this crazy, but still beautiful, world ✌️? Take your kids and have a GREAT time.

  10. Reply

    Tricia @roadtriptheworld

    February 23, 2016

    I am loving reading about your adventurous honeymoon! I’ve yet to go to the UK and now I really can’t wait until we make it there!

    • Reply

      mrandmrsadventure

      February 24, 2016

      We had never been either!! We’re still searching for the perfect fish and chips, stay tuned 😉

  11. Reply

    mrandmrsadventure

    February 23, 2016

    We never gloat, only share kindly. We promise to share all the good, great and beautiful things about your wonderful country.

  12. Reply

    Fran

    February 23, 2016

    Thank you and please do. We don’t want other tourists thinking they can take advantage. You were right about the farmer and I would do the exact same if I bumped into a foreigner. I’d show them all those little things the guide books can’t offer. Locals everywhere will offer you variety of stories, dialects, and tales passed down the ages.
    Please advertise the good things about our country and not gloat on how that generosity allowed you to mock something we work so hard to preserve. Enjoy the rest we have to offer.

  13. Reply

    Fran

    February 23, 2016

    who do you think pays for the conservation on the stones? What do you think they will look like to your grandkids if no-body pays. No more iconic places if money can’t be raised to keep them safe. Maybe when you both grow up a bit you will understand the value of donating to causes that keep history alive. As New World people, I guess you don’t have the same treats we are able to offer you in Blighty. How dare you come to UK and promote how to rip us off.
    #mrandmrsadventure I’m unfollowing and promoting other UK followers do the same for insulting our culture and history!!

    • Reply

      mrandmrsadventure

      February 23, 2016

      Hi Fran, we apologize if you feel insulted in anyway. We promise that we have not written this to insult your culture, in fact we are absolutely are enjoying everything the UK has to offer and have gladly paid entry to numerous historical sites – The Roman Baths, Salisbury Cathedral, Corfe Castle, Westminster Abbey, the list goes on. The difference is that we feel the entry to the stones was a bit steep and being that there is alternative option for experiencing such an incredible world wonder, why not walk a few extra steps and save a few extra dollars that can go towards experiencing another site, allowing you to make even more beautiful memories 🙂 We do hope you choose not to unsubscribe, as we value each and every one of our followers. I will go ahead and add in a bit addressing your concerns on this post. Thank you for writing.

Leave a Reply

RELATED POSTS